Déclencheurs semaine 33 – Prompts week 33

Et voici sans plus attendre, les prompts/déclencheurs de la semaine ! Chaque semaine, je partagerais une petite séléction de mots pour aider à vous y remettre. Il y en a assez pour en utiliser un par jour. A vous de l’utiliser comme vous voulez. Drabble, histoire sur la semaine ou le mois, idée d’intrigue, de personnage, de scène… ou rien du tout si ça ne vous inspire pas.
Si vous voulez gagner des badges sur le forum, c’est par ici.

Without further wait, week’s prompts! Each week, I’ll share a little selection of words to help you get writing. There will be enough to use one a day. Do it as you wish. Drabble, story during the week or the month, an idea for a plot, a character, a scene… or nothing at all if it doesn’t work.
If you want to earn rewards on the forum, it’s this way.

Adoration – Adoration
Compulsif – Compulsive
Débrouillard – Ressourceful
Jaune – Yellow
Humble – Humble
Irresponsable – Irresponsible
Mentholé – Mentholated
Observateur – Observant
Possessif – Possessive
Radin – Stingy
Suave – Smooth
Téméraire – Spunky

Déclencheurs semaine 32 – Prompts week 32

Et voici sans plus attendre, les prompts/déclencheurs de la semaine ! Chaque semaine, je partagerais une petite séléction de mots pour aider à vous y remettre. Il y en a assez pour en utiliser un par jour. A vous de l’utiliser comme vous voulez. Drabble, histoire sur la semaine ou le mois, idée d’intrigue, de personnage, de scène… ou rien du tout si ça ne vous inspire pas.
Si vous voulez gagner des badges sur le forum, c’est par ici.

Without further wait, week’s prompts! Each week, I’ll share a little selection of words to help you get writing. There will be enough to use one a day. Do it as you wish. Drabble, story during the week or the month, an idea for a plot, a character, a scene… or nothing at all if it doesn’t work.
If you want to earn rewards on the forum, it’s this way.

Aventureux – Adventurous
Chaud – Warm
Déloyal – Disloyal
Embarras – Dread
Flamboyant – Flamboyant
Grossier – Vulgar
Joyeux – Happy
Lâche – Coward
Poivré – Peppery
Rouge – Red
Sentimental – Sentimental
Vaniteux – Vain

Déclencheurs semaine 31 – Prompts week 31

Et voici sans plus attendre, les prompts/déclencheurs de la semaine ! Chaque semaine, je partagerais une petite séléction de mots pour aider à vous y remettre. Il y en a assez pour en utiliser un par jour. A vous de l’utiliser comme vous voulez. Drabble, histoire sur la semaine ou le mois, idée d’intrigue, de personnage, de scène… ou rien du tout si ça ne vous inspire pas.
Si vous voulez gagner des badges sur le forum, c’est par ici.

Without further wait, week’s prompts! Each week, I’ll share a little selection of words to help you get writing. There will be enough to use one a day. Do it as you wish. Drabble, story during the week or the month, an idea for a plot, a character, a scene… or nothing at all if it doesn’t work.
If you want to earn rewards on the forum, it’s this way.

Amer – Bitter
Amusant – Funny
Calme – Calm
Epicé – Spicy
Frivole – Frivolous
Gris – Grey
Honorable –  Honorable
Prétentieux – Pretentious
Spontané –  Spontaneous
Superstitieux – Superstious
Triste – Sad

ScriBuJo 23 (En)

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Year’s objectives

We’re getting back to the more optimization-oriented part of the ScriBuJo because it’s a productivity tool before it is a writing tool

You understood the concept behind weekly or monthly objectives, now we’ll cover yearly objective since the ScriBuJo is meant to be used in the long term. On the other hand, if you plan to take a break in your writing activities, it’s useless to fill it: it’d just be full of nothing.

As usual, I will ask you to prepare a nice list for the next time with the projects you want to take on, those you are nearly finished and those for whom you have pre-determined deadlines. You can also note the moments when you know you won’t be able to write (holiday, exams, health check-up, family outings…) to prepare a planning.

If you can’t plan until something as far as December, if you don’t have enough projects for now, or if to the opposite you have too many projects and can’t know for sure which one you’ll be working on durably, you can do your planning for three or six months. In the case of short stories’ anthologies or projects you’re not sure you’ll do, you can just write “project A/short stories 1” on your planning (for instance: « February: Short story 2 ») and write down the title when you know what you’ll be doing then.

ScriBuJo 22 (En)

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Reminder sheet (digest of the things you have to put into practice)

As you followed the latest articles, maybe you found strengths and weaknesses in your writings (maybe you were already aware of them). Even the best writers have their flaws and your goal will be to correct them in revisions. As Hemmingway said so well: « The first draft of anything is shit! ».

If you’re the kind to go less in length in your revisions than me, I don’t know if this page will be useful for you. It’s true that, by spending hours working on your text, you can lose the first draft’s freshness, but sometimes, it’s more than necessary.

It’s up to you to find what works for you and what you like, because it’s a very important but difficult step, especially if the new project you’re working on at the same time seems far more interesting than the one you have to rework on. If you don’t write to be published, the revision can be limited to an orthographic check.

If you have a reminder sheet so that you won’t forget anything you want to check for, you’ll save time.

I developed a checklist that I use for each scene during revision, with everything that I tended to forget – or, to the opposite, to overuse. Here is an excerpt:

  • clearly identifying the point of view’s character from the beginning of the scene and every time it changes
  • describing the place where the scene is happening if it changed from the last time
  • avoiding the talking head syndrome (when people don’t do anything except talking so that they could as well be floating heads)
  • taking off dialogues tags (“he shouted”, “he said”). It’s not about taking off every single them of them, but putting one into each sentence is useless and excessive).

I’ll come back to this later and, anyway, I’ve got two ebooks about checklists that I will present to you later.

There’s no need to do a fancy checklist or to decorate it, it’s for your eyes only. The simpler you keep it, the more you’ll want to use it. At least, that’s how I work and I noted that the quality of my writing was much better afterwards (and that revisions got much easier, too!).

 

ScriBuJo 21 (En)

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Notes about books in your genre

Same story than the last article and the second-to-last article. If you understood what made you react to something in a book, take note of it. One day, maybe you will want to create the same effect or to avoid it, so it will be useful to be able to find the author and the relevant passage rather than searching through the twelve volumes of the Sword of Truth (not that it happened to me, since I always take notes… But I’ll have to reread the first books since I haven’t studied them yet).

You don’t have to take notes for every book you read. You can have a good time with a book that doesn’t have anything particularly noteworthy.

I don’t advise you write a literary critique, either (on the matter of your writing studies, at least: if you want to do it, it’s your life!). The goal here is solely to put forward the things that you would like to recreate or to avoid.

Tomorrow will be the last time you’ll have to do something in matters of writing!

ScriBuJo 20 (En)

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List of books in the genres you write in

Many professional authors, such as Stephen King, advise you read a lot if you are a writer. “If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time to write”, he says in his book – On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Making a list of books to read is still the best way to make progress on your craft and to check how far along you are. No, reading the Harry Potter saga for the fifteenth time doesn’t count! However, rereading one volume that you especially liked (or disliked) to attempt to understand what made you feel that way – that is relevant.

If you write in a lot of genres, which can happen, you can create separate lists with fewer titles in each. I will propose a few books in an ulterior post, but you can already comment with your favourite or most hated! Just precise the genre.

As for myself, in the fantasy genre, I would put Dragonriders of Pern, by Anne McCaffrey (especially the first two trilogies; I’m currently reading the rest. All of her books until now are my favourite, especially Dragonsong, but I hate the heroine – though, luckily, she gets better afterwards) and The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel.

As for books I “didn’t like” (not that I really hated them, but I mostly read them to know where the story was going and because people were telling me they were awesome), there is the Lancedragon trilogy (Dragons of Autumn Twilight, Dragons of Winter Night, Dragons of Spring Dawning), by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, and the Blizzard novels (World of Warcraft and Diablo) by Richard A. Knaak. I like the stories, but his way of narrating… Yiiirk! I ended up forcing myself to read five pages at a time sometimes and I continued out of love for the universes and characters.

You can grade each book according to whether you liked them or not. You can also do so for the titles you remember enough or decide to put them on a “to reread” list to study them. And if you remember the last two articles, you can guess what we will cover tomorrow!

 

ScriBuJo 19 (En)

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Today’s page is closely related to yesterday’s one. If a book was useful to you, you probably got some goods tips and advice from it. You will write them down (summarised, of course) here so that you can come back to them later. That way, you won’t have to dig up the relevant page every time you need it.

Put the book’s title as a subtitle, then your notes were written the way that’s more organic for you: with keywords, dash, complete sentences… Do as you prefer, it’s not a competition.

Some books are impossible to summarise, like the thesaurus collection on characters traits or emotions that I’ve got.

ScriBuJo 18 (En)

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Listing books about writing

If you write seriously (I’m speaking about your attitude about writing, not the genre of your books!), you’ll end up reading books about writing to improve your skills. You don’t have to do that if you see it more as a hobby, but as for me, it’s my job.

I’d advise you make a list of the book that caught your eyes. That way, you won’t forget any title when the time come to buy them (happens to me all the time). You’ll also be sure of what you’ve already read. It’s hard to remember after a while, especially if you’re dealing with ebooks since you don’t often see their covers as a visual reminder.

You can take advantage of the list to “grade” books and keep a record of your opinion about the author. With time, as you learn and practice, some books will be useless for you. Therefore, it’s useless to buy the five books of So-and-so if the first one didn’t help you. Though maybe the others will be aimed at more seasoned authors, and thus more adapted to your case.

In summary, this is a homework page, because learning is never a waste.

ScriBuJo 17 (En)

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This is a direct continuation or yesterday! If you didn’t read it, it’s here.

Now, you’re free to do whatever you want (I know, it’s the concept of the ScriBuJo, but I won’t even give you a plan here, there’s no net). You’ll have to list every useful information about each concept relevant to your universe and fill accordingly. There’s no need to write down everything on the background of a species if everything you need while writing is a quick refresher that they’re smalls, squat, yellow-eyed creatures with blue spiky hair and with hairy legs. On the contrary, if they really, really hate shrimp and spit on every green object they see, you have to write it.

I’ll go over it again in a few weeks, to show you how I make my own sheets, but you shouldn’t forget that I’m an extreme plotter, so I’m a control freak that writes down everything I can. You absolutely don’t need to get that far. That being said, I’ll show them anyway, because it can give you ideas (not only to show off).

The next part will be a little less brainy, more action in the long term, see you!